Is lápiz masculine or feminine in Spanish?

How do you know if Spanish words are feminine or masculine?

Masculine nouns are used with articles like el or un and have adjectives that end in -o, while female nouns use the articles la or una and have adjectives that end in -a. To know if a noun is masculine or feminine, you should look to see what letter(s) the word ends with.

Is Casa male or female?

Spanish is very kind in that it’s usually easy to work out whether a noun is masculine or feminine. If it ends in an O it is masculine. If it ends in an A it is feminine. E.g. Mundo (world), Trabajo (job), Perro (dog) are all masculine, and Casa (house), Palabra (word), Hora (hour) are all feminine.

What are the 4 Spanish definite articles?

In English, there is only one definite article: the. In Spanish, you have to choose between four definite articles: el, la, los and las.

Can I go to the bathroom on Spanish?

¿Puedo ir al baño? – May I go to the bathroom? In Spanish, ‘¿puedo ir al baño? ‘ is a common and appropriate expression that people use when asking permission to go to the bathroom.

Why does Spanish have genders?

Both Latin and Anglo-Saxon (the ancestors to Spanish and English respectively) had not two, but three genders: masculine, feminine and neuter. … In the case of Spanish, the majority of neutral Latin nouns became masculine. Word genders is not a feature exclusive to languages derived from Proto-Indo-European though.

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Is El Agua masculine or feminine?

Agua is feminine, however, because of this pronunciation issue with the two vowels side-by-side, it’s actually ‘el agua’. Since it is truly feminine, the phrase ‘el agua pura’ is correct. Pura needs to be in the feminine form because agua is feminine, but you’ll use to masculine article el to break the double vowels.

Why is Dia masculine?

Día is masculine because it comes from the Proto-Indo-European root *diéus, meaning ‘Sky-god’ (a masculine deity) or ‘daytime sky’. It ended up with a final -a mostly because its immediate Latin progenitor, diēs, was the only masculine word in Latin’s ‘fifth declension’ noun class.